The Family Puzzles - Demystified (Sort of)

Notes


Matches 401 to 450 of 1877

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401 (Research):Source Citation: Year: 1940; Census Place: Philadelphia, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Roll: T627_3691; Page: 1B; Enumeration District: 51-138.
_________________________________
Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: Philadelphia Ward 32, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; Roll: T625_1633; Page: 8A; Enumeration District: 1063; Image: 963.
__________________________________________ 
Horace Pennington Conard
 
402 MADTIS CONDERS, the second son, was born in Crefeld, Germany, 11th month 25, 1679. He married Barbara Tyson 5th month 29th, 1706, presumably a daughter of Reiner Tyson, one of the original Crefeld emigrants, a man who figured as one of the leading Friends in the Germantown Colony. Madtis followed the occupation of a husbandman, and died in 1726, three years before his father, and when but forty-seven years of age. His wife and seven children born of the marriage survived him. The children were all minors at the time of his death, and were named respectively, Anthony, Margaret, who married Jacob Shoemaker, Cornelius, Magdalen, who married George Inglass, William, John and Mathias. He named his brothers, John of Upper Dublin, and Henry of Whitpain, for guardians of his children, and appointed "my well beloved wife" to be sole executrix of his estate. He expressed the desire that his wife and children should "live peaceably and lovingly together on my plantation, and that my children be maintained out of the profits thereof during their minority." His will was doubtless made during his death sickness, and at a time when he was too weak in body to sign his name. He lived, however, some six or seven months after preparing his will. Madtis was married at Germantown and continued to live there during his married life. His children were all born there. His descendants, most of whom adopted and spelt their names "Conard," are to be found in Chester, Lancaster, Bucks and Montgomery} Counties, and in Philadelphia and New Jersey. Among the descendants of Madtis are Samuel Conard, who for many years was the junior partner in the firm of Cooper & Conard, of 9th and Market Sts., Philadelphia, and also the Conards who have been for so long identified with the Dingee & Conard Nurseries of West Grove, in Cliester County. Madtis and his wife were doubtless buried in the old Friends graveyard at Germantown.
From:
http://www.conardfamilyhistory.com/madtis_conders.php 
Madtis Conard
 
403 (Research):Dierks, Renee (nee Conard) Age 91, of Libertyville, IL, died January 9, 2013 at Rolling Hills Manor, Zion, IL. The daughter of Norman and Florence Conard (nee Hobby), she was a native of Philadelphia, PA, and a long-time Abbott Labs employee. Preceded in death by her husband, William J. Dierks, Jr. Renee is survived by her children, William III (Kimberly), Jeffrey, Christopher, and Michele Dabbeekeh (John); her grandchildren, Shannon (Sebastian Landry), Michael (Dara), Joshua (Amanda), Timothy, Brock (Jessica), Hanna, and Ryan Bracius (Mary); and her great-grandchildren, Harper, Kayden, Kylee, Jax, Sophie, Sebastian, Abbie, and Maci. Renee is greatly missed by her family and friends. A memorial service will be held Sunday, September 1, 2013 at 11:00 a.m. at Christ Episcopal Church Chapel, 410 Grand Avenue, Waukegan, IL. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the American Cancer Society or Christ Episcopal Church Accessibility Fund.
Published in the Lake County News Sun from Aug. 29 to Sept. 4, 2013 
Renee M. Conard
 
404 1940 Federal Census
Upper Darby, Delaware, Pennsylvania
Street:«tab»Wembly Road
House Number:«tab»378
«tab»
Name«tab» Age
Norman S Conard«tab»66
Vera M Conard«tab» 63
Norman E Conard«tab»42
Renee M Conard «tab»18 
Renee M. Conard
 
405 The death of Wm. H. Conard, Monday morning at 9:20 o'clock was a shock to our city. He came in from work the previous Wednesday not feeling well, but nothing serious was anticipated. Common remedies were resorted to and he passed a comfortable night. A physician was called Thursday and the case was discovered to be some form of auto-poisoning and yet serious results were not then feared. The case was complicated by tonsillitis and articular rheumatism. About noon Sunday Mr. Conard's condition changed for the worse and death ensued the next morning as stated above.

Mr. Conard was the second son of Mr. and Mrs. Harry E. Conard. He was born in Blaine township, Sept. 3, 1887. From early boyhood he was raised in Ida Grove, attending our schools, beginning life's work and serving some time as a rural mail carrier.

In 1911 he was married to Miss Honor Jarrett, who with two children, Henry Jarrett and Wm. Homer, survives him, one little girl, Mary Margaret, passing away last winter.

Returning from Maryland to the west, Mr. Conard engaged in the grocery business, which he followed for nearly five years, selling out last April and coming to Ida Grove, where he has made his home, gathering around many new friends to add to the list of those formed in the years of boyhood and young manhood.

Besides his immediate family Mr. Conard leaves his mother and father, Mr. and Mrs. H.E. Conard, his two brothers, Morris, a farmer in Silver Creek township, and Raymond P., who is a member of the Field Hospital corps No. 1, Ft. Still, Okla.; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Jarrett, Mrs. Conard's parents and his uncle, Dillon Price.

Mr. Conard was a very highly respected young man. He was a member of the Methodist church and had been serving as secretary of the Epworth league until he was elected president, in which office he was just beginning active service. Industrious, steady, obliging, kind and friendly, he leaves an honorable record of helpful Christian living and though he has departed this life in its early promise, he has left a record of usefulness.

The funeral service will be held Thursday afternoon at 2:30 at the Methodist church and will be conducted by his brother-in-law, Dr. Frank E. Day of Ottumwa, who, with his wife, a sister of Mrs. Conard, is here. His pastor, Dr. Pierce, and Revs. Funk and Cunningham will assist. The casket will be taken to the church an hour before the service and from 1:30 friends may view the remains in the east parlor of the church. 
William Henry Conard
 
406 The Topeka Daily Capitol Wednesday July 21,1961.

Angie C. Rickel Services will be held Thursday. Services will be at 11 a.m. Thursday in the Wall=Diffenderfer Chapel for Mrs. Angie Cook RICKEL, 74, 1300 Garfield, who died at home Tuesday. She was born in Topeka and lived at Manhatten, Eskridge and Garden City before returning to Topeka in 1951. Mrs. Rickel was a member of the Beulah Chapter of the Eastern Star, White Shrine and Ladies Auxiliary to the Typographical Union. Surviving are a son, Frank Rickel, and three grandchildren of Pittsburgh, PA; four sisters, Mrs. Ida Howard of Manhatten, Mrs Frankie Irvin of Anacortes, Wash; Mrs. Nellie Lee, 1300 Garfield, and Mrs. Alice Cuddy, 2308 Ohio; and three brothers, James Cook of Coupeville, Wash; Paul Cook of Austin, Tex.; and Roy Cook of Clifton, KS. Friends may call at the funeral home from noon today to time of services. Burial will be in the Eskridge Cemetary. The Austin Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements. A Note: Parents were William Cox Cook and Alice Henderson.

Family links:
Parents:
William Cox Cook (1847 - 1917)
Alice F. Henderson Cook (1865 - 1947)

Spouse:
Henry Edgar Rickel (1879 - 1929)

Children:
Infant Rickel (1883 - 1884)*

*Calculated relationship

Burial:
Eskridge Cemetery
Eskridge
Wabaunsee County
Kansas, USA
Plot: Sec 04 Lot 085 
Angelene Rebecca Cook
 
407 Ennion Cook, 1839

Be it remembered that I Ennion Cook of the township of Birmingham in the County of Chester State of Pennsylvania (considering the uncertainty of time in this mortal state) and being of sound disposing mind memory and understanding; do make and ortain this my last
v Will and Testament in manner following Viz Imprimis, I will and direct that all my just debts and funeral expences be first paid by my Executors hereinafter named, as soon as may be after my decease

Item, I give devise and bequeath to my beloved wife Agnes Cook during her life, all the Rents Issued and profits of my Estate, Real, Personal, and mixed, whatsoever and whatsoever, to be paid to her as they may accure from time to time (after deducting for Taxes, Repairs and Collection) under the direction of my hereinafter named Executors, they being [unin] to let lease or otherwise dispose of the Plantation on which I now reside. So that it may prduce the best income, likewise to sell or otherwise dispose of any part of my Personal Estate, and Reinvest the same in such a manner as they may deem most advantageous for my said wife.

Item, being desirous that some person, a member of the same Religious Society to which I now belong, should purchase the Plantation on which I reside, I hereby authorize my said Executors, to grant, Bargain and sell the same, at such a price as they may think proper, in order to carry out my said intention, it being expected the purchaser shall make it a Residence.

Item, I further direct that if said Plantation should not be sold as above mentioned, within one year after the decease of my said wife, then my Executors may offer the same, either at private or public Sales; together with all my Personal Estate, and out of the proceeds thereof to pay the following legacies Viz

To John Cook, son of Peter Cook the sum of Two Hundred Dollars
To Stephen Cook (fuller) the sum of Two Hundred Dollars
To Ennion Cook (Miller) the sum of Five Hundred Dollars
To Ennion J. Cook or Older the sum of Two Hundred Dollars
To Lydia Way wife of Joseph Way the sum of Two Hundred Dollars
To Mary Ann Cook daughter of Stephen Cook, the sum of Fifty Dollars
To Stephen Cook son of Stephen Cook, the sum of One Hundred Dollars
To Sarah Cook daughter of Stephen Cook the sum of One Hundred Dollars
To Isaac Cook son of Stephen Cook the sum of One Hundred Dollars
To my Executors in trust, the sum of Two Hundred Dollars, the Interest of which is to be paid annually to Jane Wilfong wife of Isaac Wilfong to commence immediately after the death of my said wife, and upon the death of said Jane the principal to be paid to her heirs . .

To the Monthly Meeting of Friends held at Birmingham and West Chester, of which I am a member, I leave the sum of Five Hundred Dollars, (the sum to be paid over by my Executors to Such Person or Persons as said Meeting may appoint to receive the same), the Interest of which, is to be appropriated toward the maintenance and support of Poor Friends belonging to said Meeting.

Item, I further direct that the Residue of my Estate, after paying the foregoing sums, be divided as follows. Viz One half of said residue to be distributed among the persons before named, who are Relations of my said Wife and myself, in the same proportion as their Specific Legacies call for, and the other half of said Residue to be paid over by my Executors to the Treasurer for the time being of the Boarding School in West Town Township Chester County (under the direction of the Yearly Meeting of Friends held on Mulberry Street in the city of Philadelphia), the said sum to be appropriated, first, to the fund for increasing the sallaries of the Teachers of said Institution, and then in any other way the Committee having charge of said School mat deem proper for its benefit . . Lastly, I nominate constitute and appoint my friends Benjamin Sharpless, James Forsythe and Aaron Sharplefs, Executors to this my last Will and Testament, hereby revoking all former Wills by me at anytime made, and declaring this and this only to be my last Will and Testament, In Witnefs whereof I have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this Seventeenth day of the Twelfth Month in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred and Thirty Nine. 1839.

Signed Sealed published
pronounced and declared by the Ennion Cook (Seal) Said Ennion Cook as and for his Last Will and Testament in the presence of us

James R. [unin]

Brinton Jones

Alban Seal

Be it remembered that on the eighth day of August AD 1842 the last Will and Testament of Ennion Cook dec'd was proven and approved in all forms of law in the Court of Common pleas in and for the County of Chester (See [unin] certificate) And letters Testamentary thereon were granted to Benjamin Sharpless James Forsythe and Aaron Sharpless who were affirmed well and Truly to administer the goods Chattles and Credit of said dec'd according to law also diligently and faithfully to regard and well and Truely Comply with the provisions of the law relating to Collateral Inheretancy.

Jesse Coulson Register

LAST WILL and TESTAMENT of ENNION COOK, son of Stephen and Margaret (Williams) Cook
Born - January 1, 1773, Londongrove, Chester Co., Pennsylvania
Married - Agnes Garrett, Oct. 3, 1800
Died October 1841, Birmingham, Chester Co., Pennsylvania
Buried - Unknown
Will Obtained :
Chester County Archives
West Chester, Pennsylvania
Will Book A, Vol. 18, page 192
This will was contested by Ennion's brothers Stephen and Isaac, October 20, 1841.


R. L. Cooke, III
October 6, 1997 
Ennion Cook
 
408 (Research):"United States Census, 1940," index and images, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VRVR-2ZQ : accessed 12 Sep 2014), Luther Ferguson, Ninnescah Township, Cowley, Kansas, United States; citing enumeration district (ED) 18-25, sheet 1A, family 12, NARA digital publication of T627, roll 1226. Ina Irene Cook
 
409 Levi Cook, his wife and three of their children, Betsy,Hiram and Eli were received into the Whitelick MM in Morgan Co., IN on 14 Aug 1824. Levi, with his family had moved to IN along with his parents John and Lydia and several other families and relatives from the Westfield area of Surry Co., NC. They later moved to Hendricks Co.,IN. Levi Cook
 
410 The News-Register, McMinnville, Oregon, Wednesday, October 25, 1972

Funeral services for Nathan Cook, 84, of the Friendsview Manor, who died suddenly at his home Oct. 19, were Tuesday, October 24, in Attrell's Newberg Funeral Chapel. Interment was at the Sunset Hills Memorial Park in Portland.

Nathan Cook was born the son of Jesse and Sarah Mendenhall Cook in Mitchell, South Dakota on November 26, 1887. He came to Newberg at the age of 17 and became an electrician. On April 12, 1913 he married Nettie Morse in Newberg and they moved to Portland. Mr. Cook was employed by the old Oregon Electric Company and later by Fred Meyers in Portland until he retired. On April 1, 1961 he and his wife became the first rresidents of the Friendsview Manor in Newberg. He put retirement off for another seven years as he was in charge of all maintenance at the Manor.

He was a member of the First Friends Church in Portland for many years and was active as a choir member, soloist and usher. After coming to Newberg he became a member of the Newberg Friends Church. He became interested in polishing, and cutting and finding rocks as a hobby.

Surviving are his wife of almost 60 years, Nettie M. Cook of Newberg; one son, Francis M. Cook of Hillsboro; two brothers, Dalton Cook of the Friendsview Manor, Newberg, and Walter Cook of Portland; one sister Dula Weatherly of La Grande; and 6 grandchildren. 
Nathan Mendenhall Cook
 
411 These are the birth and death records for the children of Peter Cook/e
(c.1674-1713) & Elinor Norman, (c.1675-c.1727) copied from the original records.
Peter Cook/e of Tarvin & Elinor Norman of Kingsley, Cheshire, married at
Newton Friends Meeting, near Overton, Cheshire, England, the 7th day 10th mo 1695.
Peter died about April-May 1713 at sea during the family's removal to
Pennsylvania. All the surviving children lived in London Grove twp., Chester Co.,
for at least fourteen years before moving on. The line of John Cook/e remains
in Chester Co. after many generations.
Widow Elinor Cook married widower John Fincher about 7mo. 27, 1714, probably
at Goshen Friends Meeting, Chester Co., where John & Elinor were members. At
the time of their marriage Elinor had six children and John had seven. The
family lived on John's farm of 245 acres in Goshen twp. until 1716, when they
moved to London Grove twp., where John owned another farm. By 1720, the land
adjoining John Fincher's to the west in London Grove twp. was Peter Cook/e
and to the west of Peter was John Cook/e. Isaac Cook/e appears to be the last
child to leave Chester Co., about 1750.
Religious Society of Friends Quaker Digest Registers
Births, Marriage & Deaths For England and Wales c.1650-1837
Cheshire & Staffs Quarterly Meeting Digest Registers 1648-1837
LDS FHL Fiche #184597
Births
Book 217
pg. 37 Cooke, John 1696 7 2 son of Peter & Elinor Tarvin
pg. 39 Cooke, Mary 1698 9 12 daughter of Peter & Elinor Tarvin
pg. 43 Cooke, Peter 1700 10 4 son of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 45 Cooke, Isaac 1702 10 18 son of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 47 Cook, Thomas twin 1704 8 29 son of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 47 Cook, Abraham twin 1704 8 29 son of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 47 Cook, Elinor 1707 3 22 daughter of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 57 Cook, Mary 1709 3 22 daughter of Peter & Elinor Northwich
pg. 57 Cooke, Samuel 1712 2 23 son of Peter & Elinor Northwich
Marriages
Book 219
pg. 128 Cooke, Peter Tarvin Blacksmith Elinor Norman Kingsley Newton 1695 10
7
Deaths
Book ? (maybe 221)
pg. 77 Cooke, Mary 11 9 1700 2yrs.
pg. 87 Cook, Abraham 9 14 1704 17dys. Parents of Northwich, son Peter &
Elinor
Bob Cooke 
Peter Cook
 
412 7mo. 29, 1895. Notes of a conversation with Isaac Pyle at his home on Broad Street, Kennett Square, Chester Co., Pa. About 1831 or 1832 he accompanied his mother Ruth (Cook) Pyle, Quaker minister on her religious visit to all meetings of Warrington Monthly Meeting, York Co., Pa. They crossed the Susquehanna River, in a boat, in the midst of ice, from Columbia to Wrightsville. To Newberry Meeting next day drove to Lewisberry to visit Ruth's niece Rebecca Starr and family etc. Phebe Kaufman a niece -- a mill at the lower end of Lewisberry.
Then drove to Warrington and stayed all night at Samuel Cook's (son of Jesse) within a stones throw of the Meeting House. After meeting they went to *Samuel M. Cook's, Ruth's brother, who lived on Doe Run. They had about three children, Edwin, Cornelius, then went to Huntington Meeting. Stayed all night at Joel Garretson's. Joel preached that day. Then to Israel Cook's, who a mill on Yellow Breaches Creek, probably near Boiling Springs. Children Sarah Gilpin, See Clinton, Ailes and Israel. Israel was not a friend. Had been disowned for marrying out to Lydia Taylor. He afterwards joined Friends. He either moved to Menallen or to one of the other meetings. He married again to Leah Griest.
Notes by Albert Cook Myers dated, November 18, 1944 
Ruth Cook
 
413 Thomas Cook was born 8/29/1704 in Norwich, Chester County, England. He had a twin brother Abraham, who died very young, for whom his oldest son was named. His parents, Peter Cooke & Elinor Noram were married 10/7/1695, at Newton Monthly Meeting, Cheshire, England. Elinor was daughter of Johannes & Maria Worral Norman. Peter Cooke and family requested a certificate to Pennsylvania on 1/3/1712-13. At that time their residence was Tarvin, Cheshire, England, and there were nine children. The family was not well to do, and fellow Quakers helped them with passage money to America. The youngest son, Samuel, was buried 5/9/1713 at Philadelphia Monthly Meeting in Pennsylvania. His burial record indicates his father had died at sea. Fellow Quakers again helped Elinor Cooke with her large family until she married John Fincher. John Fincher had purchased 245 acres of land in Newtown on 14 March 1699 for 30 pounds. He was listed as "husbandman."

Peter and Elinor Cook's sons, John & Peter Cook, remained in Pennsylvania, but son Isaac and widow of son Thomas moved to the Carolinas. 
Thomas Cook
 
414 CELEBRATED HIS BIRTHDAY
WILLIAM COOK WAS 98«b» «/b»YEARS OLD LAST THURSDAY
Big Gathering of Relatives of Aged Man at the Home of a Son
-- «u»Annual Event«/u» The annual birthday reunion of William Cook was held at the home
of his son, N. B. Cook, Thursday, June 20, which brings far. «b»Cook to his «/b»98th birthday anniversary. There were 68 persons present, and all but ten of this number were related.
At noon a fine dinner was served, thanks being offered by the Rev. Jeremiah Hubbard. A bouquet of 98 different varieties of flowers was placed on the table. Several beautiful cakes were presented to the grandfather, with his name and age on them. After dinner an able address was given by the Rev. Hubbard of Miami Indian Nation.

His text was the 133rd Psalm, "Behold, how good and hoc pleasant' it is for brothers to dwell together in unity." He was followed by excellent remarks by the Rev. Clark Shawley of South Marion. Then came a short talk by Calvin Bond of Carmel, Ind., the young people giving excell.ent songs between the speeches. Brother Hubbard sang a song in the Indian language, which was new and entertaining. At the reunion were present two sons, one daughter, two daughter-in-laws, two nephews and one niece. There were 11 grandchildren, 30 great grandchildren and two great great grandchildren present also.

There were ten old people present whose birthdays took place as follows: William Cook, June 20, 1803; Jehiel Williams, a nephew, Aroma, Ind., October 5, 1821; Sarah Williams, a niece, December 12,. 1823; Asenath Nixon, Kokomo, Ind., January 2, 1821; Graham Cook, August 23, 1827; Joseph Cook, Nov. 25, 1830; Calvin Bond, Carmel, Ind., April 23, 1830; Mary Hodson, Fairmount, June 20, 1830; Anna
Jane Cook, Kokomo, May 8, 1833; and Jeremiah Hubbard, April 7, 1837,

William Cook was the eldest son of Joseph and Lydia Cook. He came to this state with his parents when a boy eight years old. His«b» «/b»father settled in Wayne County, ten miles west of Richmond. The town was laid off soon after their arrival. His father built the first frame store in Richmond.

William Cook settled west of Centerville in «i»Wayne «/i»County about 1827, and reared a family of nine children. He moved to Grant County «b»in «/b»1848 and entered 160 acres of unimproved land in Section 32, of Franklin Township. With the help of his boys he soon cleared a farm on which he has lived more than half a century and where he bids fair to celebrate his 100th birthday. His wife was a native of Grayson County, Va. and was born Sept. 18, 1804. She met her death by a distressing accident caused by a sheep striking her in the stomach, July 3, 1873«i».
«tab»«/i»_= One Who was There
**
-- Copy of a newspaper clipping found in a family bible by
Lou Miller, great granddaughter of Jehiel and Sarah Williams. 
William Cook
 
415 Zimri Cook sold his farm to Indiana Yearly Meeting in 1833 which is part of the land now occupied by Earlham College.
The following is quoted from "Earlham, the Story of the College 1847-1962," by Opal Thornburg:"The property consisted of two farms totalling 320 acres, purchased for a total of $5,800. Each farm, partly under cultivation, had a house and a barn,...."The south part of the new Yearly Meeting farm had been entered from the U.S. government in 1806 by Samuel McKinley, who sold it to Valentine Pegg in 1813 for $700. Pegg had a daughter, Lydia, who married Zimri Cook, and in 1819 Pegg sold the farm to his son-in-law for $1,500. Zimri Cook deeded it to Indiana Yearly Meeting on December 6, 1833 for $3,000 in the names of the trustees appointed by the Meeting for Sufferings: John Maxwell, Thomas Evans, Charles Moffitt, James Pegg and John Pool."The north portion, cut across by the national Road, had been owned first by Jonas Randall, who entered it from the U.S. government in 1806. From Randall the land passed in 1808 to Jesse Bond. He sold it for $850 to Jehu Stuart, who conveyed it in 1831 to David Wright, from whom the Yearly Meeting trustees on December 6, 1833 purchased it for $2,800."
-- from a genealogical note by Sandra Branson Young, "Descendants of Robert Beales" 
Zimri Cook
 
416 Edward Drinker Cope (July 28, 1840 \endash April 12, 1897) was an American paleontologist and comparative anatomist, as well as a noted herpetologist and ichthyologist. Born to a wealthy Quaker family, Cope distinguished himself as a child prodigy interested in science; he published his first scientific paper at the age of nineteen. Though his father tried to raise Cope as a gentleman farmer, he eventually acquiesced to his son's scientific aspirations. Cope married his cousin and had one child; the family moved from Philadelphia to Haddonfield, New Jersey, although Cope would maintain a residence and museum in Philadelphia in his later years.
Cope had little formal scientific training, and he eschewed a teaching position for field work. He made regular trips to the American West prospecting in the 1870s and 1880s, often as a member of United States Geological Survey teams. A personal feud between Cope and paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh led to a period of intense fossil-finding competition now known as the Bone Wars. Cope's financial fortunes soured after failed mining ventures in the 1880s, forcing him to sell off much of his fossil collection. He experienced a resurgence in his career toward the end of his life before dying of unidentified causes on April 12, 1897.
Cope's scientific pursuits nearly bankrupted him, but his contributions helped to define the field of American paleontology. He was a prodigious writer, with 1,400 papers published over his lifetime, although his rivals would debate the accuracy of his rapidly published works. He discovered, described, and named more than 1,000 vertebrate species including hundreds of fishes and dozens of dinosaurs. His proposals on the origin of mammalian molars and for the gradual enlargement of mammalian species over geologic time ("Cope's Law") are notable among his theoretical contributions.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Drinker_Cope 
Edward Drinker Cope
 
417 (Research):Source Citation: Year: 1910; Census Place: Jackson, Tippecanoe, Indiana; Roll: T624_381; Page: 7B; Enumeration District: 0174; FHL microfilm: 1374394. Lucy Grooms Coppelman
 
418 (Research):

This story indicates Aaron's father was Bartholomew Coppock. Other sources indicate his father was John. According to sources on the Internet, Bartholomew had a brother named John who died in England. So it is not unreasonable that his Uncle may have seemed to have taken a fatherly role toward his nephew - which might explain the wording "supposed to be a son of Bartholomew Coppock."

"AARON COPPOCK
This Friend was born in Cheshire, Great Britain, Tenth mo. 25th, 1662. He was convinced of the Truth when quite young, and removed to Pennsylvania soon after. He is supposed to have been a son of Bartholomew Coppock, who in 1682 settled with his family near Chester. Bartholomew was a man of good standing in civil and religious Society, being often used in religious appointments, and representing, on numerous occasions, the county of Chester in the Assembly of Pennsylvania. About the year 1714, Aaron Coppock removed to reside at Nottingham, still in the county of Chester, with his family.

Being a friend of sound judgment, and exemplary in his walking, he was, soon after his removal, chosen an elder, in which station he did not long continue, his heavenly Father having called him to the work of the ministry. During the short period that was allotted him to labour in this service, he was "concerned to exhort Friends to a life of self-denial, watchfulness and prayer." This his friends say "he did in great sincerity, zeal and innocence." He was diligent in the attendance of meetings, and, we doubt not, was often admitted to participate therein of that blessed communion which the humble worshippers of Christ Jesus do at seasons witness with him.

On the 1st day of the Tenth month, 1725, he was taken ill, and suffered greatly. During the early part of his sickness, poverty of spirit was his portion, and a consequent depression of mind. This dispensation, which was no doubt in infinite wisdom administered, soon passed away, leaving a blessed prospect of eternal happiness before him, with a sure hope that he should, through adorable mercy, partake thereof. In this assurance, knowing in whom he had believed, he departed this life, after a sickness of nine days. He was sixty three, and been engaged in the ministry of the gospel about seven." His death date in this source is listed as 10th mo, 10 day, 1725, at age 63. Memorials were often written after the fact, and included errors. This date is likely at least one year early according to when his will was written. (C-2059)

His will is as follows: "I Aaron Coppock of Notingham being Sick &weak of body but of a Sound & well Disposing mind & Memory do Make this as my Last will & teftament revoking all other wills have heretofore been Made of done by me----- First my will is (that) my body be decently buried & (that) all my Just debts & funerall Charges be defrayed as Soon as Pofsible after my decease Secondly I give & bequath Unto my Son John Coppock ye plantation whereupon I Now Live when he comes of age but my will is (that) my wife Shall have liberty to live thereupon during her Natural life & to have ye Use of (that) house & buildings (that) half of the orchard & ye half of the other Improvements upon ye plantation to be at her own difpose while Shee lives & if my wife & Son John Sees Meet to part then my Son John to have Liberty to build Upon Some other part of ye Land where he Shall think Convenient & to have ye other hlf of ye Imrovement to his own proper Ufe when Equaly divided & after his mothers decease the whole to be for ye proper Use & behoofe of his & his heirs for Every whole tract containing one hundred Acres or therabouts Item I give Unto my daughter Lydia Coppock Tenn pound Item I give Unto my daughter Miriam Coppock Tenn pound (ye said) payments to be paid Unto them Two year after my decease but if they should be Married before ye time perfixed then ye Legacy to be paid them at ye day of Marriage ------ Item I give Unto my daughter Sarah Frayzer five Shillings Item I give Unto my dauther Martha Robinson five Shillings Item I give Unto My dauther Mary Sinclear five Shillings Item I give unto my Son In Law Ralph Thomson ye Money (that) is due to me Upon bill it being fourty Shillings ------ Item I give Unto my Son In law John White five Shillings. Item I give unto my Son In Law Samuell White five Shillings Item I give Unto my daughter In Law Elizabeth White five Shillings Lastly I ordaine & Conftitute my loving and welbeloved wife Miriam Coppock Sole Executrix of this my last will & Teftament & James King (Ring?) to be Afsistant to her therein In witnefs whereof I have hereunto Set my hand & Seal Dated in Notingham In ye County of Chester & provicne of pensilvania ye 3d day of ye 10th mo 1726 Signed, Seal, publifhed and declared by ye within Named Aaron Coppock to be his Last will & testament In ye prefence of us Teftis James Wright Samuel Littler (Lighter?) Aaron Coppock prov: ye 17:10 (illegible) (C-1425c&d, 2150)

According to "Quaker Biographical Sketches" he took ill on the first day of the 10th month in 1725 and died 9 days later. Noting that his will was written in 1726, I'd say this source was simply incorrect about the year his death took place. If he was truly 63 years of age at his death, this would make his birth in 1663 instead. It should be remembered that this eulogy was written years after his death, and like many eulogies of this type, they often have data and detail errors based upon memories of persons that aren't necessarily his families'. His christening in 1666 means he's much more likely to have been born in 1666 also and that his age, birth date and death date were all estimates. (C-2260)

A prayer book had been passed down in the family to Anna Godwin that is now lost. It was inscribed in Aron's handwriting "We are the Clan MacDonell of Keppoch and our clan cry is God and St. Andrew" This clan MacDonnell was of Keppock in ancient times, and what is now the region called Glenngarry. The Coppock's that come from this clan were specifically from Lochaber in this region according to their homepage at http://www.clan-donald-usa.org/septs.htm. (Joyce Haskell-E) 15 
Aaron Coppock
 
419 From _A Collection of Memorials Concerning divers deceased Ministers and others of the People called Quakers in Pennsylvania, New-Jersey, and Parts adjacent, from nearly the first Settlement thereof in the Year 1787,_ no author given, printed by Joseph Crukshank, Market Street, Philadelphia, 1787, pages 64-5 we have the following account: "A testimony from Nottingham Monthly-Meeting in Pennsylvania, concerning Aaron Coppock. AARON COPPOCK

This Friend was born in Cheshire, Great Britain, Tenth mo. 25th, 1662. He was convinced of the Truth when quite young, and removed to Pennsylvania soon after. He is supposed to have been a son of Bartholomew Coppock, who in 1682 settled with his family near Chester. Bartholomew was a man of good standing in civil and religious Society, being often used in religious appointments, and representing, on numerous occasions, the county of Chester in the Assembly of Pennsylvania. About the year 1714, Aaron Coppock removed to reside at Nottingham, still in the county of Chester, with his family.

Being a friend of sound judgement, and exemplary in his walking, he was, soon after his removal, chosen an elder, in which station he did not long continue, his heavenly Father having called him to the work of the ministry. During he short period that was allotted him to labour in this service, he was ?concerned to exhort Friends to a life of self-denial, watchfulness and prayer.? This his friends say ?he did in great sincerity, zeal and innocence.? He was diligent in the attendance of meetings, and, we doubt not, was often admitted to participate therein of that blessed communion which the humble worshippers of Christ Jesus do at seasons witness with him.

On the 1st day of the Tenth month, 1725, he was taken ill, and suffered greatly. During the early part of his sickness, poverty of spirit was his portion, and a consequent depression of mind. This dispensation, which was no doubt in infinite wisdom administered, soon passed away, leaving a blessed prospect of eternal happiness before him, with a sure hope that he should, through adorable merey, partake thereof. In this assurance, knowing in whom he had believed, he departed this life, after a sickness of nine days. He was sixty three, and been engaged in the ministry of the gospel about seven. 
Aaron Coppock
 
420 THE COPPOCK BROTHERS.

In a biography of John Brown, published as one of the "Twentieth Century Classics,"

by Crane & Company, Topeka, Kansas, a brief "sketch of each of the men captured with "Old Osawatomie" at Harper's Ferry, with their subsequent fate, is given. Two of the entries follow:

"No. 12. Barclay Coppock. Born in Salem, Ohio, January 4, 1839, of Quaker parents, who moved to Springdale, Io\\va. Young Coppock was in Kansas a short time in 1856. Drilled in Springdale school. Although young, he seems to have been trusted by John Brown. Escaped from Harper's Ferry, and was killed in a wreck on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, caused by Rebels, who sawed the bridge timbers partially off.
"No. 13. Edwin Coppock. Lieutenant. Born near Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, June 30,' I835. Elder brother of Barclay Coppock. Hung in Virginia, December 16, 1859. \\V as brave and generous, honorable, loyal and true."

The Coppock brothers were children of Quaker parents, born and reared in the immediate vicinity of Salem. And it was the doctrine imbibed early through their Quaker surroundings, that "all men are created equal," that induced the brothers to join their fortunes with John Brown while he was yet battling for defenseless fugitive slaves in "Poor, Bleeding Kansas." They went with him on his illfated raid into Virginia, and with him were captured at Harper's Ferry, October 17, 1859. Barclay escaped, but Edwin was hanged at Charlestown, Virginia, December 16, I859. The charge under which he was indicted and convicted, in common with John Brown the leader, and executed, was for "feloniously conspiring with each other, and other persons unknown, to make an abolition insurrection and open war against the Commonwealth of Virginia." On the same day, December 16. 1859, at Charlestown, were executed with Brown these four of his soldiers: Coppock_. Cook. Copeland and Green. Two others. Stephens and Hazlett, were put to death in the same way later.

' The last letter Edwin Coppock ever wrote I was to his uncle. Joshua Coppock. then living in Butler township, Columbiana County, It is pregnant with prophesy long since fulfilled. It was written but three days before the young raider's execution, and reads as follows:

CHARLESTOWN, Dec. 13. 1859.

My Dear Uncle\emdash I seat myself by the stand to write'

for the first and last time to thee and thy family. Though far from home and overtaken by misfortune, I have not forgotten you. Your generous hospitality towards me,

during my short stay with you last spring. is stamped indelibly upon my heart, and also the generosity bestowed upon my poor brother, who now wanders an outcast from

'his native land. But I thank God he is free. I am,thankful it is I who have to suffer instead of him.

The time may come when he will remember me. And the time may come when he may still further re'member the cause in which I die. Thank God. the principles of the cause in which we were engaged will not die with me and my brave comrades. They will spread wider and wider and gather strength with each hour that passes. The voice of truth will echo through our land, bringing conviction to the erring and adding members to that glorious army who will follow its banner. The cause of everlasting truth and justice will go on conquering and to conquer until our broad and beautiful land shall rest beneath the banner of freedom. I had fondly hoped to live to see the principles of the Declaration of Independence fully realized. I had hoped .to see the dark stain of slavery blotted from our land, and the libel of our boasted freedom erased, when we can say in truth that our beloved country is the land of the free and the home of the brave; but that can 'not be. '

I have heard my sentence passed; my doom is sealed. But two more short days remain for me to fulfill my earthly destiny. But two brief days between me and eternity. At the expiration of these two days I shall stand upon the scaffold to take my last look of earthly scenes. But that scaffold has but little dread for me, for I honestly believe that I am innocent of any _crime justifying such punishment. But by the taking of my life and the lives of my comrades. Virginia is but hastening on that glorious day, when the slave shall 'rejoice in his freedom. When he, too, can say. "I, too, am a man, and am groaning no more under the yoke of oppression." But I must now close. Accept this short scrawl as a remembrance of me. Give my love 'to all the family. Kiss little Joey for me. Remember me to all my relatives and friends. And now, farewell. for the last time. From thy nephew,

Edwin Coppock.

Edwin and Barclay Coppock were sons of Samuel and Ann Coppock, and nephews of Joseph Coppock. Rev. Joseph Coppock and Isaac Coppock were brothers. The latter died in Butler township about 1895. Isaac Coppock left one daughter, Mrs. Hopkins, who was living in 1905 near Damascus, Columbiana County.

Some time after the execution of Edwin Coppock, his body was brought to Salem, and buried in Hope Cemetery. Joshua Coppock, uncle of the young raider, brought the remains home. The next day after their arrival at Mr. Coppock's house in Butler township, there were over 2,000 visitors to the little farm house, and such a funeral had never been seen in Co]umbiana County as was given this young man, who fell a victim to what he regarded as a sacred principle.

At the edge of one of the main drives in Hope Cemetery stands a plain sandstone shaft, about ten feet high, bearing the simple inscription, "EDWIN COPPOCK." In April. 1905, the mound was bare of grass or flower; but at the base of the monument was a glass jar, containing faded flowers from the season previous \emdash a silent token that some one had paid a passing tribute to Edwin' Coppock's memory. At the recurrence of each Memorial Day, the grave invariably receives its quota of flowers, though it is not officially honored as are the graves of the Civil War veterans that lie nearby.

Barclay Coppock, Edwin's brother, who,escaped from Harper's Ferry before John Brown and others of his men were captured, was hunted by men from Virginia, a reward of $4,000 having been offered for his body dead or alive. One of the hunting parties came to the house of Joshua Coppock, but did not find Barclay, for he was well guarded. After the breaking out of the Civil War, Barclay entered the service and was employed as a recruiting officer in Kansas. He had gathered a large force of men and was with them crossing the Mississippi River, when the bridge over which they were passing fell, and all were drowned.

History of Columbiana County, Ohio and Representative Citizens
edited by William B. McCord 
Barclay Coppock
 
421 THE COPPOCK BROTHERS.

In a biography of John Brown, published as one of the "Twentieth Century Classics,"

by Crane & Company, Topeka, Kansas, a brief "sketch of each of the men captured with "Old Osawatomie" at Harper's Ferry, with their subsequent fate, is given. Two of the entries follow:

"No. 12. Barclay Coppock. Born in Salem, Ohio, January 4, 1839, of Quaker parents, who moved to Springdale, Io\\va. Young Coppock was in Kansas a short time in 1856. Drilled in Springdale school. Although young, he seems to have been trusted by John Brown. Escaped from Harper's Ferry, and was killed in a wreck on the Hannibal & St. Joseph Railroad, caused by Rebels, who sawed the bridge timbers partially off.
"No. 13. Edwin Coppock. Lieutenant. Born near Salem, Columbiana County, Ohio, June 30,' I835. Elder brother of Barclay Coppock. Hung in Virginia, December 16, 1859. \\V as brave and generous, honorable, loyal and true."

The Coppock brothers were children of Quaker parents, born and reared in the immediate vicinity of Salem. And it was the doctrine imbibed early through their Quaker surroundings, that "all men are created equal," that induced the brothers to join their fortunes with John Brown while he was yet battling for defenseless fugitive slaves in "Poor, Bleeding Kansas." They went with him on his illfated raid into Virginia, and with him were captured at Harper's Ferry, October 17, 1859. Barclay escaped, but Edwin was hanged at Charlestown, Virginia, December 16, I859. The charge under which he was indicted and convicted, in common with John Brown the leader, and executed, was for "feloniously conspiring with each other, and other persons unknown, to make an abolition insurrection and open war against the Commonwealth of Virginia." On the same day, December 16. 1859, at Charlestown, were executed with Brown these four of his soldiers: Coppock_. Cook. Copeland and Green. Two others. Stephens and Hazlett, were put to death in the same way later.

' The last letter Edwin Coppock ever wrote I was to his uncle. Joshua Coppock. then living in Butler township, Columbiana County, It is pregnant with prophesy long since fulfilled. It was written but three days before the young raider's execution, and reads as follows:

CHARLESTOWN, Dec. 13. 1859.

My Dear Uncle-I seat myself by the stand to write'

for the first and last time to thee and thy family. Though far from home and overtaken by misfortune, I have not forgotten you. Your generous hospitality towards me,

during my short stay with you last spring. is stamped indelibly upon my heart, and also the generosity bestowed upon my poor brother, who now wanders an outcast from

'his native land. But I thank God he is free. I am,thankful it is I who have to suffer instead of him.

The time may come when he will remember me. And the time may come when he may still further re'member the cause in which I die. Thank God. the principles of the cause in which we were engaged will not die with me and my brave comrades. They will spread wider and wider and gather strength with each hour that passes. The voice of truth will echo through our land, bringing conviction to the erring and adding members to that glorious army who will follow its banner. The cause of everlasting truth and justice will go on conquering and to conquer until our broad and beautiful land shall rest beneath the banner of freedom. I had fondly hoped to live to see the principles of the Declaration of Independence fully realized. I had hoped .to see the dark stain of slavery blotted from our land, and the libel of our boasted freedom erased, when we can say in truth that our beloved country is the land of the free and the home of the brave; but that can 'not be. '

I have heard my sentence passed; my doom is sealed. But two more short days remain for me to fulfill my earthly destiny. But two brief days between me and eternity. At the expiration of these two days I shall stand upon the scaffold to take my last look of earthly scenes. But that scaffold has but little dread for me, for I honestly believe that I am innocent of any _crime justifying such punishment. But by the taking of my life and the lives of my comrades. Virginia is but hastening on that glorious day, when the slave shall 'rejoice in his freedom. When he, too, can say. "I, too, am a man, and am groaning no more under the yoke of oppression." But I must now close. Accept this short scrawl as a remembrance of me. Give my love 'to all the family. Kiss little Joey for me. Remember me to all my relatives and friends. And now, farewell. for the last time. From thy nephew,

Edwin Coppock.

Edwin and Barclay Coppock were sons of Samuel and Ann Coppock, and nephews of Joseph Coppock. Rev. Joseph Coppock and Isaac Coppock were brothers. The latter died in Butler township about 1895. Isaac Coppock left one daughter, Mrs. Hopkins, who was living in 1905 near Damascus, Columbiana County.

Some time after the execution of Edwin Coppock, his body was brought to Salem, and buried in Hope Cemetery. Joshua Coppock, uncle of the young raider, brought the remains home. The next day after their arrival at Mr. Coppock's house in Butler township, there were over 2,000 visitors to the little farm house, and such a funeral had never been seen in Co]umbiana County as was given this young man, who fell a victim to what he regarded as a sacred principle.

At the edge of one of the main drives in Hope Cemetery stands a plain sandstone shaft, about ten feet high, bearing the simple inscription, "EDWIN COPPOCK." In April. 1905, the mound was bare of grass or flower; but at the base of the monument was a glass jar, containing faded flowers from the season previous -a silent token that some one had paid a passing tribute to Edwin' Coppock's memory. At the recurrence of each Memorial Day, the grave invariably receives its quota of flowers, though it is not officially honored as are the graves of the Civil War veterans that lie nearby.

Barclay Coppock, Edwin's brother, who,escaped from Harper's Ferry before John Brown and others of his men were captured, was hunted by men from Virginia, a reward of $4,000 having been offered for his body dead or alive. One of the hunting parties came to the house of Joshua Coppock, but did not find Barclay, for he was well guarded. After the breaking out of the Civil War, Barclay entered the service and was employed as a recruiting officer in Kansas. He had gathered a large force of men and was with them crossing the Mississippi River, when the bridge over which they were passing fell, and all were drowned.

History of Columbiana County, Ohio and Representative Citizens
edited by William B. McCord 
Edwin Coppock
 
422 «b»Homer J. Coppock
«/b»by William J. Reagon (Earlham College class of '04)

Homer J. Coppock, (class of '04 Earlham College) died March 2 following critical burns suffered at his home in Richmond, Indiana. I knew Homer at Earlham during our years together as classmates.
«tab»We were both working our way through college; both of us were active in the YMCA; both of us have been concerned with the same interests throughout our active lives.
«tab»As a student, Homer fired the boiler in Earlham Hall. I worked in the library. Our unending friendship began in long talks and friendly arguments in the boiler room on Sunday afternoons.
«tab»Homer came to Earlham from Damascus Academy. After graduation he spent time teaching and preaching in two Quaker secondary schools. Much of his life was devoted to this religious emphasis.
«tab»He was president of Nebraska Central College for five years. He continued actively in the Yearly Meeting and in the Five Years Meeting from the time of their organization; twice he was chairman of the Program Committee of the sessions of the Five Years Meeting.
«tab»After leaving Nebraska Central College he became pastor of the Friends Meeting in Chicago. His fondness for teaching and his success in that field led him to become assistant dean of Herzl Junior college; in 1944, he was transferred to Chicago Teachers College, where he remained until his retirement.
«tab»He moved to Richmond, Indiana, but could not remain inactive. He organized the Indiana-Kentucky American Friends Service Committee work and was appointed its secretary.
«tab»He wife, Mabel Cary Coppock, '03, shared in all these activities. She was a helpful partner in his work for the Society of Friends and in his teaching experience. All five of their children are Earlham graduates; Paul R., '27; Anna Houghton, '03; Grace Bibler, '36; H. Cary, '38; and Ruth Palmer, '40. There are 19 surviving grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren.
«tab»Mabel, active in Friends circles, lives in the home she and Homer build on Quaker Hill Drive. 
Homer John Coppock
 
423 «b»Mabel Coppock McKay
«/b»
Mabel C. McKay, 88, of Midland, Michigan died Sunday, Dec 27, 1998 in Stratford Village after an extended illness.
She was born Oct 31, 1910 in Damascus, Ohio, the daughter of the late Ralph S. and Laura H. Coppock. Whe was a birthright Quaker. She lived the first 13 years of her life in Damascus, where she attended the Wilbur Friends School and the Damascus Graqde School. Her family moved to Alliance, Ohio. She graduated from the high school there, where her father was a teacher.
Her college training was received at Mount Union College in Alliance, Ohio and Asbury College in Wilmore, Ky., where she received her bachelor of arts degree in English and speech. After graduation, she remained in Wilmore for a number of years, teaching in the Asbury Academy and as assistant librarian of Asbury College. Later she continued her academic pursuits at Central Michigan University, Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., and the National College of Education in Evanston. She received her master's degree, specializing in school librarianship from Central Michigan University in 1966.
«tab»She married Orville Hl. McKay, a Methodist minister, August 19, 1935. Their 63 years together took them to appointments in New York, Michigan, Illinois and Wisconsin. She shared fully in his ministry. She also further pursued her own vocational interests through employment in the Grace A. Dow Memorial Library and as a teacher and/or librarian in Illinois, Wisconsin, and Midland. In addition to eight years of full time employment, she filled a substitute capacity for over 200 teachers and librarians.
«tab»Her personal interests were in music, reading and handicrafts. She and Dr. McKay had a mutual interest in travel, which took them all over the USA, Canada, and to 31 countries of the world.
«tab»The McKays returned to Midland in 1980 for their retirement, but active years. She was a member of the First United Methodist Church, the United Methodist Women, Church Women United, AAUW, Chippewa Nature Center, AARP, the King's Daughters and the PEO Sisterhood.
«tab»She is survived by her husband, Dr. Orville H. McKay, three daughters, Gwendolyn Wasmuth of Lake Forest, Ill., Janeth and Amherst Turner of Ann Arbor, and Kathleen and William Bilbert of Grand Rapids; five grandchildren, a sister, Mildred C. Felmlee of Muncie, Ind;, and a brother Richard A. (Marie) Coppock of San Jose, Calif.
«tab»A memorial service will be held Wednesday, Dec 30, 1998, 1:30 pm at the First United Methodist Church, Dr. Brent McCummons and Dr. David Stout will officiate.
«tab»Memorials may be offered to the First United Methodist Church or the Aldersgate United Methodist Church of Midland. 
Mabel Coppock
 
424 Mildred Coppock Felmlee attended Olivet Nazarene College and graduated from Asbury College and Ball State Teachers College. She lived in Ohio, Albany, Elkhart, and Muncie, Indiana She had taught at Harrison Township Schools and Madison Heights High School in Anderson, Indiana. Millie was an excellent seamstress, working with Decorating Den, Aero Interiors, and Kendall's Drapery Showroom in Muncie, Indiana. Millie loved music. She taught piano, substituted as the church organist, and sang in the choir. Mildred Coppock
 
425 «b»Ralph Strawn Coppock
«/b»
Ralph S. Coppock died Sunday morning, August 2, 1959. Burial was at Damascus Cemetery. He was born at Winona, Ohio, March 15, 1880, son of Isaac and Phoebe Coppock. He was a graduate of Damascus Academy and Earlham College. Upon graduation he was called to the joint task of giving pastoral care to a church and teaching in a church-controlled academy. His gift in the ministry was recognized and he was recorded a minister in 1906 while pastor of Blue River Monthly Meeting of Friends, Indiana Yearly Meeting.
He married Laura Hobson in 1906. Two daughters were born to this union.
In 1910 Mr. Coppock moved with his family to Damascus and united with Ohio Friends.
In 1922 he sustained the loss of his wife, Laura Coppock. He was united in marriage in 1924 to Judith Weaver Jones of Salem, Ohio. They moved to Alliance, Ohio that same year and untied with the First Friends Church there. It was here that a son, Richard, was born.
«tab»He is survived in death by two daughters, Mildred Felmlee of Muncie, Indiana, and Mabel McKay of Midland, Michigan, and one son, Richard A. of Scottsdale, Arizone, nine grandchildren, and one sister, Mrs. Nell Parsons of Pasadena, California.
«tab»Mr. Coppock began his work as an instructor in Alliance Hight School in 1911. He was held in highest esteem by those who knew him as teacher, athletic coach, assistand principal, and acting principal at Alliance High School through the years. Coppock Gym at Stanton Jr. High School in Alliance is a lasting memorial to this tutelage of Alliance High teams, and his 8influence upon the city's young athletes over a long period. Literally thousands of students came under his Christian influence in academic pursuits.
«tab»In his affiliation with Ohio Friends, his qualities of leadership were soon recognized and in 1911 he was chosen recording clerk of Ohi Yearly Meeting of the Friends Church. He filled this position with distinction for 8 years. He then was named Presiding Clerk of the Yearly Meeting, an appointment which he held for 34 years.
«tab»He was never absent from a single session of Yearly Meeting for 49 years.
«tab»For more than 25 years he served First Friends Church, Alliance, as Presiding Clerk. He also served as Presiding Clerk of Damascus Quarterly Meeting for consecutive terms totaling more than 40 years.
«tab»He was also an efficient bible teacher, having taught an adult bible class for 33 years, retiring one month prior to his death. 
Ralph Strawn Coppock
 
426 Richard Arden Coppock died at home on Friday, July 8, 2011. He was 86.

Richard was born January 28, 1925 in Alliance, Ohio to the late Ralph and Judith Coppock. He graduated from Alliance High School in 1943. In 1944 he married Marie Freuler, his wife of 67 years. He served in the U.S. Army fighting in the WWII Battle of the Bulge. Upon his return from the war he attended and graduated Case Institute of Technology. Richard and Marie have lived in several locations, including Canton, OH; Scottsdale, AZ; and most recently, in the Bay Area of Northern CA.

Richard was an electronics engineer with a passion for invention. He had many outside interests including music, art, photography, and golf. He was credited with many patents during his long career with companies of Goodyear, Motorola, Wiley Electronics, Sylvania, and Crystal Technologies. He retired only upon reaching the age of 80.

Richard is survived by his wife Marie and five children. Son Doug and wife Lonnie; daughter Cynthia Weidemaier and husband John; daughter Jody; son David; and daughter Lisa. He is also survived by seven grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by two sisters, Mildred and Mabel.

Memorial Service will be held 11:00 am Saturday July 16, 2011 at The Darling Fischer Chapel of The Hills 615 N. Santa Cruz Ave. Los Gatos. Donations in memory of Richard Coppock may be made to the American Diabetes Association. A special thanks to Dr. Toby Gottheiner and Satellite Dialysis for their special care. 
Richard Arden Coppock
 
427 (Research):The Corbly Family Massacre refers to the massacre of John Corbly, his wife and five children by Indians on May 10, 1782.
The Corbly family lived at Gerrard Station, on the Monongahela River, not far from Redstone Old Fort in western Pennsylvania. The massacre occurred on Sunday morning, May 10, 1782, as the Corbly family traveled on foot to their place of worship. The Corbly family had left their home and were on their way to worship at a place where Reverend John Corbly was to preach. When Corbly discovered that the Bible, which he thought was in Mrs. Corbly's care, had been left at home, he returned to get it and then followed his family, meditating upon the sermon he was to preach.
A party of Indians were on Indian Point, an elevation of land from which they could see John Corbly's cabin. The Indians descended the hill, crossed Whitely creek and filed up a ravine to the place, about forty-nine rods north of the present John Corbly Memorial Baptist Church, where the helpless family was massacred. Two of Corbly's daughters, Delilah and Elizabeth, lived after brutal scalpings. Mrs. Corbly and the three remaining children were killed.
Because of the rise of ground the fort was out of view of the massacre, but was within hearing distance. The screams of the Corbly family were heard there and in a few minutes men on horseback rushed from the fort to give help.
The John Corbly Memorial Church was built in 1862. A plaque erected by the Daughters of the American Revolution (DAR) in 1923 and set in a boulder reads: "Fort Garard built about 1774". The Corbly massacre took place about 279 yards north on May 10, 1782. 
John Corbly (Corbally)
 
428 A copy of a letter from Mr John Corbly a Baptist Minister to his friend in Philadelphia - dated Muddy Creek Sep 1 1792 (Whitley was called Muddy Creek at the time).
"The following are the particulars of the destruction of my unfortunate family by the savages on the 10th day of May last 1791. Being my appointment to preach at one of the meeting-houses about a mile from my dwelling house, I set out with my loving wife and five children for public worship, not suspecting any danger. I walked behind a few rods with my bible in my hand meditating. As I was thus employed on a sudden I was greatly alarmed by the frightful shriks of my dear family before me. I immediately ran to their relief with all possible speed vainly hunting a club as I ran. When within a few yards of them my poor wife observing me cried out to me to make my escape. At this instant an Indian ran up to shoot me. I had to strip and by so doing out ran him. My wife had an infant in her arms which the Indians killed and scalped after which they struck my wife several times but not bringing her to the ground. The Indians who attempted to shoot me approached her and shot her through the body after which they scalped her. My little son about six years old they dispatched by sinking there hatchet into his brain. My little daughter four years old they in like manner tomahawked and scalped. My elder daughter attempted an escape by concealing her self in a hollow tree about six rods from the fatal scene of action. Observing the Indians retiring, as she supposed, she deliberately crept out from the place of her concealment when one of the Indians who yet remained on the ground espying her ran up to her and with his tomahawk knocked her down and scalped her. But blessed be God she yet survives as dose here little sister whom the savages in like manner tomahawked and scalped. They are mangled to a shocking degree but the doctors think there are some hope of their recovery. When I supposed the Indians gone I returned to see what had become of my unfortunate family whom also I found in the situation above described. No one my dear friend can form a true conception of my feelings at this moment. A view of a crime so shocking to humanity quite over come me. I fainted and was unconsciously boarn off by a friend who at that moment arrived to my relief. Thus my dear Sir I have given you a faithful though short narrative of the fatal castraphe amidst which my life is spared but for what purpose The Great Jehovah best knows. Oh may I spend it to the praise and glory of his grace who worketh all things after the counsel of his own will. The government of the world and its church are in his hands. I conclude with wishing you every blessing and subscribe myself your affectionate though afflicted friend and unworthy brother in the gospel ministry. John Corbly. " 
John Corbly (Corbally)
 
429 William Corse was born Oct. 7, 1804, near Darlington, Harford Co., Md., and was married, April 13, 1831, to Deborah S., youngest daughter of Robert Sinclair, of Baltimore City. Mr. Sinclair was born Sept. 22, 1772, married, on Sept. 6, 1795, Esther Pancoast, and died Oct. 27, 1853. When William Corse, Sr., was twenty-two years of age he removed to New York, and there engaged in the hide and leather business. On his return to Maryland he resided first in Harford County, and then came to Baltimore County in 1838. In that year he succeeded to the ownership of the famous nurseries that had been es- tablished by his father-in-law, and in 1847 he purchased and added to them " Farley Hall," an estate of one hundred acres that had been the country-seat of the Bowley family. " Farley Hall" was built over a century ago, and there is now paper on its walls that was put on eighty-five years ago. Mr. Corse was a member of the Society of Friends, and attended Lombard Street meeting. He died March 8, 1869, deeply revered by all who knew him. His children were
Mary W., married to Dr. Edward S. Campbell, of Philadelphia;
Carrie D. ;
Robert Sinclair;
Dr. George F. ;
Esther Sinclair, married to Maj. E. C. Gilbert, United States army ;
Dr. William ;
Annie C, married to Calvin Conard, of Philadelphia ;
Frank ;
Lucy, married to Dr. Frank K. Belts, of Philadelphia; and
Harry C, the latter deceased.
The magnificent nurseries established by Mr. Sinclair and improved and extended by Mr. Corse are still maintained under the firm-name of William Corse & Sons. 
William Corse
 
430 [Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 6, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Jan 23, 1999, Internal Ref. #1.111.6.124120.14]

Individual: Jarvis, Anna
Social Security #: 544-30-4355
Issued in: Oregon

Birth date: Mar 31, 1886
Death date: Dec 1987


Residence code: Oregon

ZIP Code of last known residence: 97115
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:

Dundee, Oregon 
Anna Belle Coughtry
 
431 [Broderbund Family Archive #110, Vol. 1 A-L, Ed. 6, Social Security Death Index: U.S., Date of Import: Jan 22, 1999, Internal Ref. #1.111.6.53024.175]

Individual: Coughtry, Archie
Social Security #: 482-38-0783
Issued in: Iowa

Birth date: Aug 12, 1884
Death date: Sep 1969


Residence code: Nebraska

ZIP Code of last known residence: 68776
Primary location associated with this ZIP Code:

South Sioux City, Nebraska 
Archie Russell Coughtry
 
432 DR. WILSON V. COWAN
One of the old school of physicians was Dr. Wilson V. Cowan, born near Urbana, Ohio. January 11, 1816. Atler receiving such instruction as the public schools afforded he attended Miami University taking a four years' course. He was a graduate of the Ohio Medical College of Cincinnati and in 1814 commenced the practice of his profession in Hardin, Turtle Creek, township, which he continued up to his death in 1874. He was elected to the lower house of general assembly in 1856 and in 1861 joined the Fremont Body Guards as assistant surgeon. He was surgeon of the 1st Ohio Cavalry and afterwards was made brigade surgeon. He was married in 1845 and had a family of eight children.
He was an excellent physician, suave and gentle in his manners, kindly in the
sick room and a charming entertainer in his home. A most ardent Methodist
and a stanch Republican in politics. 
Wilson Virgil Cowan
 
433 (Research):Abraham received 200 acres with his brother Nehemiah from Randal Blackshaw on 1 Mar 1696/7o. He is recorded as the witness to several weddings of relatives. From 1733 to 1735 he is found in financial trouble with warrants issued for his arrest on a couple of occasions. Other tragedy included the apparent illness that struck down 4 children in the same month (Stuebing p 5-7). Abraham Cowgill
 
434 Aquilla J. Cowgill, a son of the above named Ralph Cowgill, was born in Loudon county, Virginia, September 28, 1801. He came to Belmont county with his parents in 1806, as previously stated, and located on the farm where he is now living. His education was acquired in a log cabin school house that stood on his father's farm. He was reared a farmer and has followed farming during his life. He married Margaret Clark in 1842, and settled on the farm where he is now living. Their union resulted in two children, (sons). His wife died in 1856, and in 1857, he married Sarah Milner. They are spending their old days in peace, surrounded by all the comforts of life, and esteemed all who know them. Aquilla J. Cowgill
 
435 ISAAC AND HIS BROTHER RALPH DID NOT LEAVE VIRGINIA UNTIL THE DEATH OF THEIR FATHER, RALPH. HE LIVED IN WHEELING, VA (NOW WV) IN 1797- 1799. HE THEN MOVED ON TO BELMONT CO., OHIO. ISAAC AND HIS FIRST WIFE MARRIED OUT OF UNITY WITH THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. SARAH MADE AMENDS AND RETURNED TO MEMBERSHIP. ISAAC WAS REINSTATED IN THE CONCORD MM IN 1802 WITH HIS SON ABRAHAM BUT AGAIN WAS DISMISSED FOR MARRIAGE OUT OF UNITY. Isaac Cowgill
 
436 (Research):Ellen’s husband was said to have been Ralph Cowgill, who was hanged in 1682 for being a Quaker. His execution took place in England. I first came across this information in a document entitled "Cowgill" by Chester A. Cowgill, who does not give his source (Salt Lake film #0974080). It is also stated by Ellen Logan Sands in her Genealogy of the Sands, Cowgill, Rober, Wager, Rittenhouse, Logan, Carver, Carter, Magill, Mower and Related Families (1939) that Ellen‘s dates are 1636-1705 (baptized Nov 1673) and that she and Ralph were married in 1656. This information has been posted by Steven Beckler of Medford, Oregon on his website, but with the caution that no primary source verifies that Stackhouse was Ellen’s maiden surname. Ralph Cowgill
 
437 (Research):RALPH COWGILL IS A DESCENDENT OF RALPH COWGILL, SON OF ELLEN COWGILL, WHO WAS BORN IN 1667, ENGLAND. RALPH CAME TO AMERICA ON THE SHIP, "THE FRIENDS" AS AN INDENTURED SERVANT TO RANDELL BLACKSHAW. HE ARRIVED IN 1682. RALPH HAD FOUR CHILDREN BY SARAH BLACKSHAW AND SEVEN BY SUSANNAH PANCOAST. THEY WERE ABRAHAM; JOHN, NEHEMIAH, SARAH, REBECCA, MARY, ISAAC, RACHEL, JANE, JACOB, AND SUSANNA. RALPH AND FAMILY RELOCATED TO CHESTERFIELD M.M.. IN 1716. LATER TO MIDDLETOWN M.M., BUCKS COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA. THE NEW JERSEY HIST. SOCIETY HAS THE ORIGINAL FAMILY BIBLE IN WHICH RALPH AND LATER ISAAC, WROTE THE BIRTHS AND DEATHS OF THE FAMILY MEMBERS. RALPH, SON OF ISAAC AND SARAH, WAS TAKEN BY HIS PARENTS FROM LOUDOUN COUNTY, VIRGINIA, TO BELMONT COUNTY, OHIO, WAITED BY THE RIVER IN THE AREA WHAT IS NOW NEAR WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA, AND THEN SETTLED ON A FARM JUST OUTSIDE OF THE CURRENT TOWN OF ST. CLAIRESVILLE, OHIO. RELIGION: SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. RALPH WAS AN ELDER IN THE COMMUNITY. THE INFORMATION ON THE COWGILL FAMILY IS NOTED IN THE MINUTES OF THE SOCIETY OF FRIENDS. Ralph Cowgill
 
438 (Research):will dated 9 Nov 1794 and proved 9 Feb 1795 in Loudoun County VA. Ralph was in Solebury 1761, Plumstead 1763, 1764; on 13d 9m 1777 he witnessed the will of Thomas Smith of Plumstead, his brother-in-law. In 1778, Ralph was "taken off" the Solebury Twp tax rolls, but was taxed there in 1781 - 1784. That same year, 1784, Ralph and son James are taxed in Shelburne Parish, Louden Co, VA. Buckingham MM granted him certificate to Goose Creek MM VA. H G & Carole Stuebing, Descendants of Ellin Cowgill (Baltimore: Gateway 1994) p 5-13 Ralph Cowgill
 
439 It has been reported that Ralph was arrested and put to death (hanged) in 1682 for his religous views. Ellen Cowgill is mentioned in the "Settle Certificate" dated 07Aug1682 showing intention on removing from Settle,Yorkshire,England to Pennsylvania. She and 4 children embarked on the ship 'Lamb' with William Penn's group arriving in Pa. 22Oct1682. Their eldest son, Ralph, came on the ship 'Friends Adventure' at the same time. The certificate was recorded at Middletown,Bucks,Pa. Although the surname Stackhouse has been accepted by many researchers as being Ellen's maiden name, a primary source has not been located to verify this. Ralph Cowgill
 
440 Ralph Cowgill was born in Berks county, Pa 1775. He went to Virginia when a young man and there learned the blacksmith trade. He married Mary Carter, of Virginia, and in 1806, he, with his wife and six children, moved to Belmont county, and located in Kirkwood township, on section thirty-one. His first improvement was a round log cabin, in which he lived for a few weeks, then he erected a hewed log house with shingle roof, (it being the first shingle roofed house in the township) in which he lived during the remainder of his life. There is a hewed log barn still remaining on the farm in a good state of preservation, 26 x 63 feet, that was built by him in 1808. He owned one section of land (No. 31) and followed farming during his sojourn in Belmont county. He reared a family of nine children, viz: Margaret, Isaac, William, Aquilla J., Tamer, Jesse, Sarah, Eliza and Ralph. All are deceased except three, Isaac, Aquilla J. and Eliza. He died in 1840; his wife survived him until 1851. Ralph Cowgill
 
441 The passenger list from the "Freinds Adventure" 1692. Ralph is the son of Ralph:
Friends' Adventure September 1682, Thomas Wall, master, one of Penn's fleet Thomas Barrett William Beasy John Brearly Luke Brindley Samuel Buckley Thomas Buckley John Brock John Clows Joseph Clows Sarah Clows Ralph Cowgill Andrew Heath Eliza Heaton John Heycock Job Houle Thomas Leister Henry Lingart Daniel Milnor Joseph Milnor James Morris Ralph Nuttall George and Eleanor Pownall and children: Reuben, Elizabeth, Sarah, Rachel and Abigail Martha Worrall William and Jane Yardley and children: Enoch, Thomas and William Shadrach Walley William and Elizabeth Barrett Venables and children: Joyce and Frances 
Ralph Stackhouse Cowgill
 
442 From:
History of Miami County, Indiana: a narrative account of its historical progress, its people and its principal interests, Volume 2, Arthur Lawrence Bodurtha

Hon. Jabez Thomas Cox. Judge Cox has long held secure prestige as one of the representative jurists and lawyers of Indiana. His family was founded in this commonwealth more than sixty years ago, and its earlier history was identified with American annals from the early colonial era. His paternal great-grandfather was a soldier in the Continental line in the War of the Revolution, serving with South Carolina troops, and after the war became a pioneer settler at Nashville, Tennessee. Two great uncles of Judge Cox, Captain Walker and Colonel Henderson, were gallant officers of the War of 1812 and both were killed in the Battle of New Orleans. Another great-uncle, James Watts, who was an ensign in a Nashville Company of Mounted Riflemen, in the Creek Indian war was killed in one of the engagements with those Indians.
Though Judge Cox is a native of Ohio, he was only about four years old when the family came to Indiana, and this state has been his home the greater portion of his life. He was born in Clinton county, Ohio, January 27, 1846, a son of Aaron and Mary (Skaggs) Cox, the former a native of Ohio. The grandfather was a native of North Carolina. Aaron Cox was an Ohio farmer until 1850, when he brought his family to Indiana, and established his home in Hamilton county, where he developed a productive farm and became on honored and influential citizen. Both he and his wife passed the closing years of their lives in the city of Indianapolis.
Under the conditions and influences of a pioneer farm in Hamilton county, Jabez T. Cox grew up strong in body and not without his stirrings of inspiration and ambition for a larger sphere of usefulness during his mature years. The early district schools of that locality gave him a knowledge of books, and he studied much privately, and also took a course in Westfield Academy in that county. He was known as a very bright scholar in that community, and when sixteen years of age qualified himself for the dignified position of teacher in a district school, in which a number of his pupils were older than himself. He early had definitely decided upon the law as the regular career for his efforts, and took up the studies of Blackstone under Judge James O'Brien, a leading member of the Hamilton county bar, and at that time living in Noblesville. Early in 1864, when eighteen years old, Judge Cox tendered his services to the Union enlisting as a private in Company B of the One Hundred and Thirty-sixth Indiana Volunteer Infantry. The greater part of his service was on detached duty, since his command did not get into action in any of the great battles of the closing period of the war.
Soon after receiving his honorable discharge, Judge Cox resumed his studies at Tipton, in the office of his uncle Nathan R. Overman, who later served on the bench of the circuit court. In 1867 he was admitted to the bar, and forthwith engaged in the practice of his profession at Tipton. He applied himself closely to his work, and soon gained recognition as one of the rising young attorneys of the Tipton county bar. In 1869 he temporarily retired from the law to take up journalistic enterprise. He bought the plant and business of the Frankfort Crescent, a weekly paper issued at Frankfort in Clinton county. Judge Cox was editor and publisher of the Crescent until February, 1872, when he sold the property and returned to Tipton. There he engaged in practice as a member of the firm of Overman, Cox & Parker, the senior member of which was his uncle and former preceptor. Judge Overman. During his successful practice at Tipton which continued until 1875, Mr. Cox made a reputation as a resourceful trial lawyer and also as a counselor. In that year he moved to Kansas, establishing his home at Hutchinson, where he soon gained a leading rank in the local bar. In 1878 he was Democratic nominee for the office of attorney general of Kansas, and though defeated he made such a spirited and effective canvass throughout the state that in the ensuing election he had the satisfaction of running thirty thousand votes ahead of the general average of his party ticket. , ,
In the spring of 1879, bwing largely to the seriously impaired health of his wife, Judge Cox moved to Canyon City, Colorado, where he practiced law until February, 1883. His wife had in the meantime died, and on leaving Colorado, Judge Cox returned to Indiana, and established his home in the city of Peru. Here he has since given his attention to the practice of law, and to the duties of public office. He is known as one of the strong and versatile members of the bar, of Miami county, and hap the highest ideals of his profession, and has always maintained the strictest standards of professional conduct.
Since his return to Indiana, Judge Cox has been much in public life. In 1887, Miami county sent him to the state legislature. While in the capital he was the first active promoter of the Employers' Liability Bill in Indiana, and though the bill failed of passage, owing to dissension incident to the election of a United States senator, he paved the way for later legislation along the same line. In 1890 Judge Cox was honored by his associates and by the citizens of his circuit in election to the office of circuit judge, and on the bench made an able and conscientious administration, of such a character that he was retained in office by reelection in 1896. Judge Cox was thus on the circuit bench for twelve years, and while always absolutely fair and impartial in his decisions and maintaining the strictest discipline in his court, he proved one of the most popular judges who ever presided over the circuit court at Peru. Very few of his decisions ever received reversal by the higher courts. Since retiring from the bench in 1902 Judge Cox has been engaged in the practice of his profession at Peru. His clientage and his reputation place him among the leading members of the Indiana bar, and his services and counsel have been required in connection with many large and important interests.
Judge Cox has always been one of the effective advocates of the principles and policies of the Democratic party. During the years of his residence in Peru, he has been a delegate to practically every convention in Indiana. As a citizen he is liberal, loyal and progressive, and his influence and cooperation are always depended upon in the support of measures for the general good of the community. Judge Cox affiliates with the Masonic Order, the Knights of the Maccabees, and he and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal church.
On March 14, 1867, Judge Cox married Miss Jennie Price, of Tipton. Her death occurred at Canyon City, Colorado, in September, 1882. Only one of their three children is living: Edward E., editor and publisher of a weekly newspaper at Hartford City, Indiana. In May, 1884, at Peru, was solemnized the marriage of Judge Cox to Miss Elizabeth Meinhardt. Her death occurred in 1893. Of the two children born to that marriage, Carl died when four years old, and Mary Elizabeth, who is a successful and popular kindergarten teacher, resides in Peru. In July, 1895, Judge Cox married Miss Addie Allman, of Huntington, Indiana. Mrs. Cox is one of the popular factors in church and social life at Peru. 
Jabez Thomas Cox
 
443 The original journal is written in old-fashioned script longhand. It is thought that it was written about 1877, when Jehu was 74 years old. In order to make the diary a bit easier to read present day spelling and punctuation have been substituted where needed. The meaning has not been changed in any way, but in cases where subject matter and words did not seem to be clear they have een enclose din parenthesis. The journal follows:
"Jehu Cox, history of my forefathers to the best of my memory. My great grandfather, his name was Solomon Cox, he lived in the state of Pennsylvania when my grandfather was born. My grandfather was the youngest of fifteen children, and his name was Solomon after his father. My grandfather married Amy Hussey and lived in Virginia, and raised a family of 10 children (and the first child) and the last died with her tenth child; her name was Mary, she married a man, his name was Thomas Mahan. My grandfathers family was 5 sons and 5 daughters. My uncle's names were Solomon and Absolom and Christopher and Thomas, who is my father, and Steven. My aunt's names were Martha, and Amy and Mary and Ruthy, the other I have forgot. (Ann).
Jehu Cox, the son of Thomas Cox, was born in the state of Kentucky, Knox County, Sept. 5, 1803. When I was three weeks old my father moved to Green River in the state of Kentucky, and when I was 9 months old my right hand was burnt, and when I was 6 years old in the year 1809, my father moved to the state of Ohio, to Salt Creek which runs in to the Scioto, then called Ross Count, 24 miles feast of Chillicothe. When I was 11 years old I lived with my grandfather Solomon Cox 3 years and when I was 15 years old in 1818 my father moved to the state of Indiana, Monroe County, Bloomington the count seat. In 1820 father moved 12 miles east of Bloomington on Salt Creek, the waters of (Wabash) River, and there I got acquainted with Srah Pyle and we was married Jan 13, 1824.
Here I made a farm and we lived 4 years and we had 3 children - Rosanah, Edward and Thomas. Edward and Thomas died and we were sick every year and we thought that we would move and in Dec. 1827 we moved to Wabash, Warren County, Indiana, where Henderson Cox was born Nov. 6, 1829, and in 1830 (we) moved with my father-in-law to Vermillion River, Vermillion County, state of Illinois, where we were all sick. Here we made a farm and raised a crop. Here was the milk sickness and I lost while at this place 5 head of horses and a good many cattle. And in 1831 (we) moved to Indiana, Putnam County, Greencastle the county seat, and bought 80 acres of land and opened a farm in the heaviest of timber and lived here 4 years where I had my health but my wife was sick most of the time. Here Sarah Cox was born Feb. 28, 1832, and Mary Jane Cox was born Sept. 19, 1833, and Elias Cox was born Jan. 15, 1835.
I told my wife that we would move until we could find a healthy place, so we started in 1835 and went to the state of Missouri on the Ozark Mountain in Crawford County where (we made) a farm and we all had good health, and here Rachel Cox was born March 17, 1836, and Jehu Cox was born June 15, 1837, and hear Isiah Cox was born May 18, 1839.
We embraced Mormonism. I was baptized on Jan 12, 1838 by Benjamin Clapp and your mother was baptized in Feb. 1839 by Isaac Allread, and I was ordained elder under the hands of Benjamin Clapp and Isaac Allread, and in Nov, 1839, we moved to Adams County, Ilinois, below Quincy, where I raised two crops, and here Lucnecy Cox was born in Adams County, Illinois, De. 21, 1842, and was blessed by Joseph Fielding, and when we were coming up Platte River to the (Valley) she was run over with a wagon and died June 15, 1848.
Then I moved to hancock County, Illinois, within three miles of Nauvoo, where Emmy Cox was born June 16, 1844, and here Nephi Cox was born in Hancock, Illinois, March 20, 1846, and was blest by Joseph Fielding, and died April 29, 1846.
And Here we lived 4 years, and in May the 20th, 1846, we left Nauvoo and came to (Pishey) and planted some corn, and then word came for all that wanted to come to the bluffs on the Missouri River and there the Mormon Battalion was made up and Henderson Cox went in the Mormon Battalion and in July 22, 1846 we stayed at what was called the point on the east of the Missouri River until the spring of 1847, and then moved to the west of the river 7 miles above winter quarters and made a crop and Br. Campbell's farm and here Joshua Cox was born in the Omaha country 7 miles above winter quarters, July 14, 1847, and died the same day.
In the spring of 1848 we started for the mountains, we left the farms the 28th of April and went to winter quarters, and stayed there until the 18th of May and then went to the Born River and stopped there until the 7th of June and then started up the (Platte River?) and about the 10th was appointed Captain of 10 in Br. (Haraman's) company by Br. Heber (Kimbell) and we landed where Salt Lake City now stands Sept. 24, 1848.
My ordinations: I was ordained elder by Benjamin Clapp and Isaac Allread Feb. 1838, and was ordained a (saint) by Benjamin Clapp and Daniel D. Hunt Jan. 18, 1851, and I was ordained a high priest and counsellor to Silas Richards by Edward Hunter and Willard Snow and Daniel Spencer, and since I have lived in (Sanpet Co.) at Fairview, I have been counselor to three bishops: James Jones and Andrew Peterson and Amasa Fulker, and am president of the high priest forum in Fairview, and am vice president of the United Order in Fairview (Utah). 
Jehu Cox
 
444 RICHARD COX, son of Thomas Cox and Sarah Busby, was born in Chester Co., PA. He removed to North Carolina with his father in 1741 and settled in Craven County at a settlement known as Quaker Neck. RICHARD COX amassed large land holdings in and around the Quaker Neck community and owned and operated at least four grist mills. He received his first land grand for 150 acres on 8 Oct 1748. The land was located on the south side of the Neuse River in the settlement known as Quaker Neck.

RICHARD COX was first married about 1750 to Elizabeth, whose maiden name (according to family legend) was Applewhite. He was a widower by 1768, when he married Mary Kennedy.

Soon after arriving in North Carolina, RICHARD COX reestablished himself as a Quaker. At that time, Friends in the Quaker Neck community had to travel some distance to attend the Lower Falling Creek Monthly Meeting at Core Sound. In 1772 they requested that Monthly Meetings should be held nearer to the Quaker Neck settlement. The following appeared in the minutes of the Lower Falling Creek Monthly Meeting:

"4th day of 5th month 1772: It is the judgement of this meeting in as much as Friends are mostly removed by death and otherwise from the Meeting House at Lower Falling Creek, that the next ensuing Meeting be held at RICHARD COX'S near Upper Falling Creek and so to continue till the advice of the Quarterly Meeting can be known."

"3rd day of 8th month 1772 at RICHARD COX'S near Upper Falling Creek:
It appears that by death and removal of Friends that first day Meeting at Lower Falling Creek is dropt. This meeting appoints William Lancaster, RICHARD COX, Joshua Davis, Micajah Cox and John Kennedy to present the state of this meeting to the Quarterly Meeting."

Records indicate that the Friends met at the home of RICHARD COX until a Meeting House was erected at the Quaker Neck settlement. These Meetings were known as the Neuse Preparative Meeting (they were later replaced by the Great Contentnea, or Contentnea, Monthly Meetings, which were held some 15 miles north of Quaker Neck.)

In May 1782, RICHARD COX gave two acres of land on the Neuse River, which included a Meeting House, for the use of the Friends:

To all Christian People to whom these presents shall come, Greetings. Know ye that I RICHARD COX OF Wayne County in the State of North Carolina farmer for divers good causes and consideration but especially for and in consideration of the love and good will that I have for the Religious Society of the People commonly called Quakers have given granted alienate convey and confirm unto each and every Member of the Society aforesaid one certain piece or parcel of land situate in Wayne County aforesaid and on the south side of Neuse River containing by estimation two acres including the Meeting House of the said Society called Quakers where it now stands. To have and to hold the above mentioned and gifted premises with the appurtenances unto the above named Society called Quakers and every member thereof now living or that may ever hereafter live convenient unto the said Meeting House and that is held in unity with the Monthly Meetings of the said people and their successors in religious Society. And I the said RICHARD COX for myself my heirs Executors and assigns do hereby covenant agree and engage with the members of the said Society that they and every of them shall from time to time and at all times forever hereafter have hold and possess use and enjoy the said lands and appurtenances and furthermore doth agree and engage to Warrant secure and for ever defend the same unto the said Society against the lawful claim of any person whatsoever being myself lawfully possessed of the same as by patent granted to me bearing the date 25th day of January One Thousand Seven Hundred and Seventy Three may more fully appear to which the aforesaid piece of parcel of land is a part clear of every encumbrance whatsoever. In witness whereof I the said Richard Cox have hereunto set my hand and fix my seal this eighteenth day of the fifth month in the year of our Lord Christ one thousand seven hundred and eighty two.

Signed: RICHARD COX

Witnesses:
William Fellow and Sterling Powell

Proved in open Court, October Term 1785, Wayne County, North Carolina. 
Richard Cox
 
445 (Research):In the name of God, Amen. I, Solomon Cox, late of Hocking County and State
of Ohio, considering the uncertainly of this mortal life being weak of body
but sound and perfect mind and memory blessed by almighty God for the same
do make and publish this my last will and testament in manner and form
following. That is to say first I give and bequeath unto my eldest daughter
Martha Cox the sum of one dollar which is her full share of my estate with
what she hath already had. I also give and bequeath unto my daughter Mary
Cox and her heirs one dollar which is their full share of my estate with
what she and they hath already had. I also give and bequeath unto my
daughter Ann Perkins one dollar which is her full share with what she
already hath. I also give and bequeath unto my son, Absolom Cox, one
dollar which is his full share of my estate with what he already hath. I
also give and bequeath unto my son Christopher Cox one dollar which is his
full share with what he already hath. And also I give and bequeath unto my
son Thomas Cox one dollar which is his full share with what he already had.
I also give and bequeath unto my son Stephen Cox one dollar which is his
full share with what he already hath. I also give and bequeath unto my
daughter Amy Mahan one dollar which is her full share with what she already
hath. And as to all the residue and remainder of my estate, goods and
chattels of what kind and nature soever it may be to be equally divided
between my loving wife Amy Cox and my son Solomon Cox, share and share alike
and what livestock there may be the same to keep or dispose of at their
election. And lately I do appoint my son Solomon Cox and William Dixon sole
exectors of this my last will and testment hereby revoking all former wills
made by me. In witness whereof I have herewith set my had and seal this
Ninth day of September in the year of our Lord One Thousand Eight Hundred
and nineteen. 
Solomon Cox, Sr.
 
446 (Research):MEMORIAL MARKER Compiled By BUFORD C WILSON Buford_Wilson@Hotmail.Com This memorial is located in Carroll County Virginia, at the entrance to the Glenwood Methodist Church, about 0.10 mile east of the intersection of Rt. 608 (Coal Creek Road) and Rt. 609 (Peaks Mountain Road). GPS Coordinates: N 36.62769 W 080.88667 Apr 30 2006 This is a granite monument with a brass plaque that reads as follows: IN MEMORIAM Solomon Cox Born in New Castle Del 1730 Removed to N C 1754 Fought in the Battle of Alamance 1771 Built his first cabin on Cole Creek 1773 Fought at Kings Mountain 1780 Died in Ross County Ohio 1812 Solomon Cox
 
447 Solomon Cox was born about 1745 in Warrington, York County, Pennsylvania.Warrington - a live Quaker community - was the home of the Cox, Hussey, and Garretson families. These clans had stuck togerther for generations. Many inter-marriages had cemented the tribe into a solid unit. When Solomon was a lad of ten his father John joined the Hussey and Garretsons for a long move to Cane Creek, Orange County, North Carolina, a distance of 300 miles. Cane Creek was a real Mecca for the Society of Friends. These Quakers hoped to establish a new Zion amongst the slave holders of the South. A Quaker Meething was organized and a progressive community sprang into existence.
Like the Mormons in Jackson County, the Quakers soon found themselves surrounded by intolerant neighbors. The slaveholders looked with suspicion on these strange people whose religion opposed slavery. Suspicion led to antagonism and conflicts. Finally, persecution became so violent the Quakers abandoned Cane Creek and settled in eastern Tennessee, Kentucky, and western Virginia.
Meanwhile, as indicated above, John Cox with three children arrived in Cane Creek April 19, 1755. We first hear of Solomon, the youngest of the three, in 1766 when he married Naomi Hussey. This pair obeyed the first commandment fully for within 15 years ten children came to bless their home. A tradition in the family says that Solomon was excommunicated by his Quaker Friends. He was found guilty of militant activity with the Regulators who opposed British taxes. Since the Quakers opposed war their action against Solomon is understandable. But we in our day are proud to learn that Solomon made a contribution in the cause of freedom.
Military activity was only a sideline for Solomon. He had ten children to support. Ruth the youngest, was born in 1780 or 1781. This was about the time that pressure from the slave holders became so great the family decided to move away. County records give us some idea where they went. From the tax lists of Montgomery County, Virginia in 1782 we find that Solomon and Naomi were among 14 Cox families in that county. Later, in 1785 we find that Solomon Cox received a land grant from the State of Virginia for 330 acres on Fox Creek in the same county. About 1789 Montgomery County was divided. The area around Fox Creek became a part of Wythe County. Solomon remained on the Fox Creek property for seven years. May 1, 1792 he sold the farm to David Pugh (Deed Book 1, page 103). After the sale was completed he seems to have moved south into Grayson County.
We find the family in Grayson County in 1795 for Solomon Cox is on the Personal Property Tax list for that year. This is the year that son Thomas married Rachel Carr. Solomon does not appear on the Poll Tax lists after that date. This may or may not mean he moved elsewhere. The law exempted persons over 50 years from paying the tax. Since Solomon was 50 in 1795 he may have remained longer. It is also reasonable to believe that he followed his son Thomas into Tennessee the next year (1796) for that's where Thomas' first child was born. Henceforth, it seems Solomon followed Thomas whenever he went. Jehu writes that he was alive in 1818 when Jehu was 15 years old. Thomas Cox was living in Monroe County, Indiana in 1818. Jehu implies that his grand father lived near the home.
We might safely conclude then that Solomon Cox lived to be at least 73 years old and that be died after 1818 somewhere in Ohio or Indiana.
Jehu writes that Solomon was the fifteenth child of Solomon Senior. His Journal was written in 1877 when Jehu was 74 years old. The items recorded were based entirely on what his memory could produce. Experience teaches us that accuracy in genealogy cannot depend wholly on memory. Research, has convinced us that his memory was faulty. A careful study of Quaker records force us to conclude that Solomon Cox was the son of John--not Solomon Senior. The latter did not exist. The proof for this conclusion is found in the fact that Martha Cox, the daughter of Solomon, was excommunicated (disowned) by the Quakers for marrying her first cousin Samuel Cox (Hinshaw, Vol. 1, p. 381). This Samuel Cox was the son of Samuel Cox, Sr. --brother of our Solomon Cox. This Senior Samuel was the son of John and Mary Cox. Now, if this Senior Samuel was the son of John and Mary Cox, why couldn't Samuel's brother (our Solomon) be a son of John too? We shall rest our case here and rush on to other problems.
John Cox came to America with his parents in 1708. We do not know where they lived in England -- probably from some Quaker community. John was born about 1685 which means he was about 22 on arrival. It is believed the group landed at Newcastle, Delaware where they lived for a season. Later the family moved to Kennett, Chaster County, Pennsylvania, a Quaker center. This was their residence for about ten years. During that period John Cox Senior died, 1711. We have no idea when his wife Rachel passed away.
It is the writer's opinion that John Junior married soon after his arrival in America probably about the year 1709. His wife's name could be Hannah Jenkins with whom he had about ten children. After her death he married a lady whose first name was Mary, maiden name unknown. With her he had several children, the last one was (our) Solomon. Who was that Mary? She may have been a Garretson, a Hussey, or even a Wierman. If Mary was the mother of five children then Jehu was right -- Solomon war indeed the youngest of 15 children. If the reader disagrees with this conclusion then let him come up with a more logical one. Meanwhile, after the first marriage, John Jr. moved to Warrington, York County, Pennsylvania, this is where most of the children were born. Warrington was another live Quaker community.
As indicated above, John was the son of John and Rachel Cox Senior.
Nothing is known of Rachel's ancestry. John and Rachel were about 20 years of age when John Jr. joined the family. This means the parents were born about the year 1665. A tradition in the family says they were invited to Pennsylvania by William Penn. They should have known George Fox personally for the founder of the Society of Friends lived till 1691.
The Cox family may have taken part in the first Quaker Meeting in 1761.
This is the end of the Cox line. We shall now return to Solomon Cox and his marriage to Naomi Hussey at Cane Creek in 1766. Naomi Hussey was born February 29, 1742 at Warrington, York County, Pennsylvania, the daughter of Christopher and Ann Garretson Hussey. Christopher was a staunch Quaker, who in 1748, had served as a minister at Warrington. He was born in 1718 at Newcastle, Delaware, married September 5, 1736 in Kennett, Chester County to Ann Garretson. In April 1738 Christopher and Ann moved to Warrington where all their 5 children were born. After 1744 the family moved to Guilford County, North Carolina where Christopher died about 1773. Later his wife Ann moved to Cane Creek where she succumbed in 1801. 
Solomon Cox, Sr.
 
448 (Research):Source Citation: Year: 1920; Census Place: School District 43, Dawson, Montana; Roll: T625_968; Page: 6A; Enumeration District: 76; Image: 1015. John S. Cravens
 
449 Date of death and age (32 y, 11m, 14d) of Elizabeth Ann (Crawford) (Shockley) Hussey are from the grave marker inscription in the Shockley-Ross Cemetery, Union Township, Highland Co., OH. The 1860 census for Highland County lists Charles Albert Shockley, age 12, born in Ohio, living in the household of Nathan and Elizabeth Hussey. Charles is Elizabeth's son from her previous marriage to Charles D. Shockley. Elizabeth's other children of her previous marriage, Celesta Ann and Sylina Augusta Shockley, were under the care and guardianship of Abraham S. Amberg. He was appointed guardian of all three children on 14 January 1853. Elizabeth Ann Crawford
 
450 Description of Charumier: From a letter by Mrs. Susan C. Williams, of Fort Wayne, Ind.:"The house was what might be called a villa--covering a good deal of ground, built in an irregular style of various materials--wood, stone, brick, and one mud room, which by the way, was quite a pretty, tasteful spare bedroom. The part composed of brick was a large octagon drawing-room, the only really handsome room of the establishment. The dining hall was a large square room, wainscoted with black walnut, with very deep window-seats, where we children used to hide ouselves behind the heavy curtains. There were one large, square hall, and numerous passage ways, lobbies, areas, etc. the grounds were quite extensive and very beautiful. At that early period there was not, perhaps, in this country so highly and tastefully improved a country seat. It was the admiration of all who visited it. Distinguished strangers visiting Lexington were always taken there. Grandpa (David Meade) was very fond of company and exceedingly hospitable. These grounds, to me in my youthful days, were a perfect paradise, never having seen anytyhing to compare with them. And even now, though there are very many expensively improved country seats, probably surpassing this in many respects, yet, so far as my experience goes, none more natural and tasteful, if so much so. The extensive lawn in front of the house terminated with what we call a 'sink-hole,' around which we delighted in running, and finally getting to the bottom--but which the late Dr. Holley, of Transylvania University, more poetic, was pleased to call a 'dimple on the cheek of nature.' And then the walks--the serpentine, one mile around--the haw haw, a wide straight walk with an echo, both of these with white benches at intervals, and in a secluded nook a most beautiful, tasteful Chinese pavilion. The bird-cage walk was one cut through a dense plum thicket excluding the sun; it led to a dell where was a large spring of the best water, ane near by the mouth of the cave which had some little notoriety. At this point was the terminus of the lake, at which, after a hard rain, there was quite a water-fall, which grandpa much delighted in. On the lake was a small boat, 'Sidney,' which some one of us, as the 'Lady of the Lake,' used to row from one side to the other stopping at a miniature island for duck eggs.From the shore to the island there was a pretty little bridge, and on the border of the lake at a distant point was the 'Temple of the Naiads,' which was also utilized as a seed repository. I should have mentioned before, that beyond the lawn there was a large piece of ground which grandpa always said ought to have been a sheet of water to make his grounds perfect. This was sown in clover, that it might, as he thought, somewhat resemble water in the distance. In one of our summer sojourns at Chaumiere, when my sister Julia (Mrs. Ball) was about 3 years of age, soon after our arrival, the nurse took her out on the lawn, when she shrank bank and cried out, 'Oh river!, river!' greatly to our grandfather's delight. He said it was the greatest compliment his grounds had ever had. Having a competency, and being possessed with a love of nature and the beautiful, he shunned a busy, bustling life. I must not omit to say that both he and grandma were all that their slaves could desire in them as master and mistress. All that were capable of taking care of themselves were manumitted at his death."Thus ends Chapter 3 of "The Chaumiere Papers," an uncopyrighted book containing matters of concern to the descendants of David Meade, edited by Henry Peet, in 1883. Susan P. Creighton
 

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