The Family Puzzles - Demystified (Sort of)

Thomas Turnbull, Jr.

Male 1865 - 1948


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  • Name  Thomas Turnbull, Jr. 
    Suffix  Jr. 
    Born  4 Jul 1865  New York, New York, New York, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender  Male 
    Died  23 Dec 1948  Fauquier, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID  I603  My Genealogy
    Last Modified  12 Dec 2010 

    Father  Thomas Turnbull,   b. 30 Jun 1834,   d. 16 May 1915 
    Mother  Janet Duncan Catanach 
    Family ID  F2961  Group Sheet

    Family  Mabel Gordon Hussey,   b. 29 Mar 1867, Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 15 Sep 1948, Fauquier, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Married  4 Jun 1894  Allegheny, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Children 
     1. Thomas Turnbull, III,   b. 29 Nov 1896, Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1 Feb 1967, Saint Petersburg, Pinellas, Florida, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     2. Curtis Hussey Turnbull,   b. Apr 1898,   d. 1921, Paris, France Find all individuals with events at this location
     3. Harriet Byram Turnbull,   b. 21 Sep 1900,   d. 6 Aug 1992, Fauquier, Virginia, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
     4. Janet Duncan Turnbull,   b. 1903,   d. 1984
     5. John Gordon Turnbull,   b. 2 Aug 1904, Casanova, Fauquier, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 1984, Front Royal, Warren, Virginia Find all individuals with events at this location
     6. Frederick William Turnbull,   b. 19 Feb 1907, Pittsburgh, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 20 Nov 1979, Mongomery, Maryland, USA Find all individuals with events at this location
    Last Modified  12 Dec 2010 
    Family ID  F230  Group Sheet

  • Event Map
    Link to Google MapsBorn - 4 Jul 1865 - New York, New York, New York, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsMarried - 4 Jun 1894 - Allegheny, Allegheny, Pennsylvania, USA Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 23 Dec 1948 - Fauquier, Virginia, USA Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
     = Link to Google Earth 

  • Notes 
    • Gazzett - -June 7, 1894

      A DAY OF WEDDINGS.


      HUSSEY -TURNBULL NUPTIALS SOL -

      EMNIZED IN SPLENDOR
      Pink Weddings and June Roses
      Numerous A Brilliant Event at
      Creighton-Several Others on the


      Card To-Day-Society Gossip.
      :


      The society event of yesterday was the wedding at St. Andrew's Episcopal
      church, Ninth street, where In the presense of a large number of friends
      Miss Mabel Gordon Hussey became the bride _ of Dr. Thomas Turnbull of
      Allegheny, formerly' of Hartford, Conn. It was a. marriage of great
      interest to large circles. the bride being the daughter of one of the
      wealthiest families in Allegheny, and an heiress in her own right. The
      groom represented an old and highly honored family of Conneticut. The
      church last evening at 8 o'clock was crowded with friends and relatives,
      and was very handsome in its decorations of palms and ferns, making a
      dense green background for the bridal party as It stood about the altar.
      Beneath a pionted arch of graceful vines, spanning each middle isle the
      party entered, the ushers, Mr. John Hussey, Mr. Irving Lyne, Mr. Chester
      B. Albree, Mr. J. Verner Scalfe, Mr. Charles Fred Holdship, Mr. Chauncey
      Williams, Mr. Grant McCargo and Mr. Henry MeKnight, leading the way,
      followed by the little flower girl l Ethel Byram, a cousin of the bride,
      in a sweet gown of white silk and lace, carrying a basket filled with
      roses.

      The brides maids, Miss Alice Holdship. Miss Julia Phillips, Miss Lydia
      McKnight, Miss Maidie Siebeneck, Miss Mollie Lyne of Hartford, Conn., and
      Miss Mary Turnnbull, wore handsome gowns of white moire silk and chiffon,
      with: large boquets of lillies of the valley. Hussey, the sweet maid of
      honor, was attired in a beautiful gown of white silk and immediately
      preceeded her sister, who was escorted to the altar by her brother, Mr.
      Curtis G. Hussey. The fair bride was stately in a sweeping robe of riches
      satin and point lace, very simple in style with an immense train, high at
      the neck, hugh sleeves holding out the veil, which fell in graceful folds
      about the elegant gown. She carried a boquet of whit roses. Orange
      blossoms appeared In the folds of the veil. Mr. James Turnbull, brother
      of the groom, acted as best man Rev, Dr. Storrs of Brookline, Mass., was
      the officiating clergyman.
      A reception at the home of the bride' mother on Cedar avenue, Allegheny,
      immediately followed the wedding, where amid ferns and flowers, Mr. and
      Mrs. Turnbull received the good wishes of their friends, of whom nearby
      200 were bride and groom left on an extended we ding trip. The
      bridesmaids and usher receive many souvenirs of the wedding, among them
      being dainty Jeweled pin from the bride and beautiful pearl scarf


      Socity

      Society Post June 7, 1894

      The marriage of Miss Mabel Gordon Hussey to Dr. Thomas Turnbull, which
      took place last evening at St. Andrew's Episcopal church at 8 o'clock,
      was one of the prettiest weddings of the season, and was probably the
      largest Pittsburgh ceremony scheduled for this month, The church was
      decorated with green and white. The chancel had a delicate tracery of
      green on the white curtain at the back, and was filled with immense
      palms, which reached to the ceiling, forming a bower for the party during
      the ceremony. Rev. Dr. Storrs, of Brookline, Mass., officiated, in the
      absence of Rev. White, pastor of the church, who was too ill to be
      present. It was distinctively a white wedding, all the gowns being pure
      white, and all the flowers used of the same hue. The ushers wore lilies
      of the valley and sweet peas.

      The bride's gown was of rich white satin, made in elegant simplicity, and
      trimmed with exquisite lace. - Her veil was fastened with white blossoms,
      and the bouquet was also snowy white, The ushers walked first to the
      altar to the strains of the Lohengrin march, then the flower girl, little
      Ethel Byram, clad in soft white and carrying an immense bunch of white
      bride's roses, followed by the maid-of-honor, Miss Clara Hussey. The 6
      bridesmaids, Misses Madie Siebeneck, Julia Phillips, Mollie Lyon, Alice
      Holdship, Mary Turnbull and Lydie McKnight, wore gowns of white moire,
      made with big puffed sleeves, and carried bouquets of white sweet peas
      and lilies of the valley.

      Mr. James Turnbull, brother of the groom, acted as best man, and the
      ushers were Messrs. Grant McCargo, Chester Albree, J. Verner Scaife,
      Chas. Holdship, Henry McKnight, Chauncey Williams, Irving Lyon and John
      Hussey. The maids and ushers formed a group inside the rail and the bride
      and groom knelt directly in the center, making an impressive picture. The
      stately service of the :Episcopal church was used, and concluded with a
      blessing on the future life of the couple. Mendelssohn's wedding march
      was played after the ceremony was performed. The church was completely
      filled with the principal society people of both cities, and almost all
      the ladies were in evening dress, making a brilliant scene. Ninth street
      and the vicinity was blocked with carriages for almost an hour.

      A reception was held at the Hussey residence, on Cedar avenue, and the
      couple left then for & honeymoon tour, which will last for some weeks.
      They will reside With the bride's mother for a short time after their
      return, until their own handsome home is made ready for them. Quite a
      large number of out-of-town guests were present, including relatives of
      the groom, and many friends. The splendid array of wedding gifts
      testifies to the widespead popularity of both bride and groom, and is
      second to none of the year.